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Author: Subject: Walking Distances - Athletes vs Couch Potatoes
celesi
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[*] posted on 5-28-2014 at 07:13 PM
Walking Distances - Athletes vs Couch Potatoes


Any runners or walkers or hikers have some advice for me?

At the beginning of my story, the two MCs have very different physiologies. One has lived in the woods for years, and walks all day, every day. The other has lived in a tower, and walks sedately on a treadmill only when forced.

Also: how did you feel when you gradually started walking and running? I'm assuming it took weeks or months to build up endurance.
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[*] posted on 5-29-2014 at 12:17 AM


I've been a runner for over ten years now - I can't remember a whole lot about how I felt when I first started running, but it did take a long time to build up endurance. I was pretty fit when I went out for track in middle school... it was easy for me to start out doing 2-4 miles a day pretty regularly. For people who aren't that active, it can take quite a bit longer to go such a distance.

It's pretty typical to be sore the next day after doing a hard workout of a few miles or more, even when you've been running for years (though a "hard" workout becomes a lot harder - ie, a hard workout for me is not what somebody who's only been running for a few weeks would be able to do).

Once you get your endurance built up, you can gradually increase your mileage every week. That's how marathon training goes - your longest run may be 6 miles the first week of training, but you're doing 20 miles by week twelve without much difficulty. When I was in high school, the longest runs we typically did were 6-8 miles - it wasn't until college that I started going longer distances and building more endurance.

For someone who's sedentary and wants to start running, a typical program that they might do is what is called a "couch to 5k program" - a quick search should probably yield quite a few results for you there.

I'm not sure what all specifically you might want to know, but feel free to keep asking questions if you have any!




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[*] posted on 6-13-2014 at 04:49 PM


One thing I remember from when I went from inactivity in the winter to walking more and more (this was years ago), was that the exercise would cause the skin in the legs to tingle and prick, and sometimes itch. At least, it did with me. It faded as I kept it up over the next few weeks.



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